king-grandma:

sarajevomoja:

David Suzuki in this interview about facing the reality of climate change and other environmental issues from Moyers & Company.

wow this is so true

AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

mashatupitsyn:

New essay on new work, Love Sounds, a 24 hour oral history of love in (English speaking) cinema.

forgottenness:

All Ears,” Masha Tupitsyn, Entropy, May 8, 2014

You will always be too much of something for someone: too big, too loud, too soft, too edgy. If you round out your edges, you lose your edge.

(Source: sadsister)

The thing about cultural appropriation is that the appropriator does not have to face the same consequences that we do for practicing our culture or faith. For them, it is an accessory that can be taken on or off at will, while for us, it is a way of life. …in a society where immigrants and communities of color are marginalized at every level, we can’t pretend that power relations do not exist when we have this conversation about appropriation. Sharing and exchanging cultural and spiritual practices is great, but it gets more complicated when we’re not all on equal footing. It gets more complicated when meaningful things are taken, commodified, and exploited for a profit, with little respect shown to the community they were taken from.
  

dumpmeinthebayou:

First Aid Kit - My Silver Lining

candypriceless:

'Untitled #479'
1975 | Cindy Sherman 
Among Sherman’s earliest works, Untitled #479 (1975) gives evidence of the creative mode that would become her signature.  It also reveals a telling affinity with Warhol’s Photobooth Self-Portraits (ca.1963).  Sherman has identified this composite of 23 wallet-size pictures—made for a class assignment when she was still a student at Buffalo State College—as her “first serious work.”

candypriceless:

'Untitled #479'

1975 | Cindy Sherman 

Among Sherman’s earliest works, Untitled #479 (1975) gives evidence of the creative mode that would become her signature.  It also reveals a telling affinity with Warhol’s Photobooth Self-Portraits (ca.1963).  Sherman has identified this composite of 23 wallet-size pictures—made for a class assignment when she was still a student at Buffalo State College—as her “first serious work.”

(Source: moma.org)